October 30, 2022


Georgetown Mayor Josh Schroeder, center, presented members of the League of Women Voters of Williamson County with a proclamation naming November 2 as Jessie Daniel Ames Day within the city. The proclamation comes one week before Jessie Fest, a November 2 event recognizing Ms. Ames’ efforts in the women’s suffrage movement and against racial violence.   Pictured left to right are League members Vicki Stubbington, Greg Wallace, Mr. Schroeder, Helen Cordes, President Pam Mitchell and Jan Wallace.

Georgetown Mayor Josh Schroeder, center, presented members of the League of Women Voters of Williamson County with a proclamation naming November 2 as Jessie Daniel Ames Day within the city. The proclamation comes one week before Jessie Fest, a November 2 event recognizing Ms. Ames’ efforts in the women’s suffrage movement and against racial violence.   Pictured left to right are League members Vicki Stubbington, Greg Wallace, Mr. Schroeder, Helen Cordes, President Pam Mitchell and Jan Wallace. 

 

November 2 tabbed Jessie Daniel Ames Day

By BRIGID COOLEY 

Georgetown city leaders honored Jessie Daniel Ames — a Williamson County suffragette and anti-lynching advocate in the 1900s — with a proclamation at Tuesday’s city council meeting. 

Mayor Josh Schroeder read the proclamation and named  November 2 as Jessie Daniel Ames Day throughout the city.

“[Ms. Ames] devoted 30 years of her life to the public as a crusader for racial justice and gender equality at a time when neither topic was accepted by the society in which she lived,” Ms. Schroeder read. “Her pioneering efforts helped lay the groundwork for the flowering of the Black Rights and Women’s Rights movements in the 1960s and 1970s.” 

Born on November 2, 1893, Ms. Ames spent much of her life working for voting rights for women throughout Georgetown, Williamson County and the state. She founded the Georgetown Equal Suffrage League and went on to work with the Texas League of Women Voters on both local and statewide levels.  

Once women's suffrage was accomplished in 1919, Ms. Ames broadened her efforts by advocating against racial violence. She served as director of the Texas Council of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation and founded the Association of Women for the Prevention of Lynching, a group of white women who organized to reduce racial violence within communities. 

The proclamation was given to attending members of the League of Women Voters of Williamson County, who are organizing a November 2 event to celebrate Ms. Ames. Coined as Jessie Fest, the event begins at 7 p.m. November 2 — which would be Ms. Ames’ 139 birthday — at Lark & Owl Booksellers, 205 West Sixth Street. 

The November 2 event, which will include birthday cake, informational speeches and other historical details, is free and open to the public. People can register to attend at www.eventbrite.com/e/herstory-jessie-daniel-ames-birthday-celebration-tickets-444410452627?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

“Our thanks to Mayor Schroeder and all the council people for making this Jessie Daniel Ames Day coming up on November 2,” Helen Cordes, a member of the League and also the Jessie Fest chair, said during Tuesday’s meeting. “She is not joining us for her 139 birthday, but I am certain she is pleased with your action. Thanks for your attention to illuminating the contributions of all our diverse residents and bringing their stories to life.”

In addition, city officials recognized October as Breast Cancer Awareness Month with a seperate proclamation, congratulated staff graduates of the city’s 2022 Engaged Leaders Program and recognized members of the city’s Public Works department for winning a 2022 Municipal Excellence Award from the Texas Municipal League for its Downtown Ambassador Program, which helps keep the Square clean.